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Medical City Dallas Offers New CyberKnife® M6™ System

Medical City Dallas July 14, 2017

Physicians can now provide cancer patients pain-free, non-invasive treatment option

DALLAS – Doctors at Medical City Dallas are now treating cancer patients using a robotic radiosurgery system designed to treat cancerous and non-cancerous tumors anywhere in the body, including the head, spine, lung, prostate, liver and pancreas. The new FDA-cleared CyberKnife® M6™ System is a non-surgical treatment option for many patients who have inoperable or surgically complex tumors, or who may be looking for an alternative to surgery.

“At Medical City Dallas, we take pride in offering the most advanced cancer treatment options available,” said John O’Connor, MD, Medical Director, Medical City Dallas CyberKnife Program.

The CyberKnife M6 System offers unique capabilities that not only track tumor movement, but also automatically correct for motion throughout treatment. The ability to manage motion in real time helps ensure radiation is delivered only to the tumor while decreasing exposure to healthy tissue. It is particularly helpful for treating tumors of the lung, liver and prostate, where movement is common. Research shows a reduction in radiation exposure to healthy tissue helps reduce side effects associated with treatment. In addition, the CyberKnife M6 System’s robotic arm allows for the delivery of radiation from any angle without the need to reposition the patient on the treatment table.

Backed by numerous peer-reviewed studies supporting its safety and efficiency, the CyberKnife M6 System provides a non-invasive option for patients who are looking for an alternative to surgery and for patients who have inoperable or surgically complex tumors. In addition, the CyberKnife M6 System is increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy, allowing for a shorter course of treatment. CyberKnife M6 treatment is typically completed in just one to five treatments, instead of weeks of treatment often required with conventional radiation therapy. Unlike surgery, it requires no anesthesia or recovery time.
 

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